Metric Specific Concepts
  • 21 Aug 2020
  • 8 Minutes To Read
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Metric Specific Concepts

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Before You Begin

The Metric Concepts below assume that you have a good understanding of the basic Key Concepts. If not, we suggest you familiarize yourself with the basic Key Concepts first.

About Metric Specific Concepts

It’s important to understand how reports are utilized and calculated. Metric Concepts provide dimensionality to reporting concepts that help you understand how it is used to calculate data within a report.

Agent Activity

In order to track what agents are spending their time on, you can calculate their utilization. When an Agent is logged into Gladly, that Agent can either be Away or Utilized .

  • Login Time = Away Time + Utilized Time
  • % Utilized = Utilized Time / Login Time

Tip

These are Agent based metrics.

Away

There are two ways an Agent can be Away:
Away Time = Away Status [Reason] + Idle Time

Away Status

An Agent can select the away status from their profile. Away reasons are configurable.

Note

We only report on the current state of Away statuses. This means if you change the name of an Away status(es), you will not be able to see what the data looked like before you made the change.

Idle Time

Agents are Idle if they haven’t moved their mouse within X minutes, where X is a configurable number with a default setting of 10 minutes.

Example 1

After X minutes of not moving the mouse, we mark the Agent idle.

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Example 2

If an Agent is marked as idle but returns more than 90 minutes later, the entire 90 minutes is counter as logout time.

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Utilized

When an Agent is Utilized, this means that the Agent has moved their mouse within the last X minutes; X is configurable.

When an Agent is utilized, we can tell what the Agent is viewing on the screen.

  • Utilized Time = Time Viewing Customer Profiles + Time Viewing Inbox + Time Viewing Search + Time Viewing Liveboards + Time Viewing Answers + etc

The Time Viewing Customer Profiles is what we use to calculate Handle Time metrics as well as for the % of Time Helping Customers.

  • % of Time Helping Customers = Time Viewing Customer Profiles / Utilized Time

Conversation Event Metrics

When looking at the lifecycle of a Conversation, there are three specific events that can happen:

  • Created
  • Closed
  • Reopened
Tip

These are Conversation based metrics

Closed Conversations & Close Time

In order to calculate the Close Time for a Conversation, we use the Created and Closed events.

Example

  • If we have a Conversation that is created at 11:05 am and closed at 11:25 am, the Close Time is 11:25-11:05 = 20 minutes
  • Close Time is attributed to the time interval in which the Conversation closed.

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Reopened Conversations & Close Time

When a Conversation reopens and closes again, we now know more about what happened with that Conversation so we add this information to the report.

Example

  • If the Conversation above is reopened at 11:35 am and then closed again at 11:55 am, the Close Time is 11:55-11:05
  • The Close Time is still attributed to the time interval in which the Conversation closed. Notably, we do not change the report data in the 11:00-11:30 interval. We simply report on the information that is available at the time.
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Watch Out

There are three exceptions to the above:

  1. Operational Summary report
  2. Agent Performance Summary report
  3. Active Conversation Handle Time (ACHT) reports

For these reports, the Close Time metrics are attributed to the interval in which the Conversation closed. However, if that Conversation reopens & closes again, we will rewrite history. We realize this isn’t ideal and will update how these metrics are calculated in the future. Using Close Time as an example, the data would look like this if a Conversation closed, reopened, and then closed again

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First Contact Resolution (FCR)

First Contact Resolution is when a reported issue is resolved on the Agent’s first interaction with the Customer without any additional follow-up. This is summed as a collective % of inbound Contacts from your Customers.

  • A Conversation with a single exchange between an Agent and a Customer, which indicates that a single Agent solved the Customer’s ask in one go.
Tip

These are Conversation level metrics

Calculation

Not all Conversations are eligible for First Contact Resolution. When calculating a % of Conversations that are FCR, we look at:

# FCR Conversations / # FCR Eligible Conversations

The following aren’t included in the # FCR Eligible Conversations denominator:

  • If a Conversation only has outbound communications (from Agent to the Customer), and there are no responses from the Customer, the assumption here is that the Customer might not have had an issue to be resolved.
  • If a Conversation has only incoming Mail (email, voicemail, abandoned calls —not including messages), but no response from Agents, the assumption here is that the Agent determined that there wasn’t an issue to resolve. For example, SPAM conversations that are automatically closed would fall in this category and would be excluded from the calculation.

Calculation Classification

Conversations are considered as FCR if they consist of:

  • Only 1 phone call, or
  • Only 1 messaging contact, or
  • Only 1 outbound communication (voice, messaging, or email) after 1 or more inbound messages (messaging, email, voicemail, or abandoned calls). The outbound communication needs to be the last communication in the Conversation (i.e. the Customer can’t reply).
Watch Out
  • Auto-replies are not considered in calculating FCR. If a Customer emails in, gets an autoreply email and then gets their issue resolved on the first actual reply from an agent, then that would be considered as an FCR conversation.
  • Future iterations could make this metric more sophisticated about other cross-channel scenarios. For example, sending an SMS during a phone call, or starting a second messaging contact just to say “thanks” (after the first contact was ended) would make the conversation Non-FCR today, but in the future, we could consider those as FCR. The issue is still being resolved in one go.
  • FCR metrics are attributed to the interval in which the Conversation closed. However, if that Conversation reopens & closes again, we will rewrite history. We realize this isn’t ideal and will update how these metrics are calculated in the future.

Handle Time

Handle Time is a key contact center metric that is used to assess how efficient your agents are when they work on customer questions.

Work

When an Agent is logged into Gladly, we can tell what that Agent is viewing on the screen. When an Agent views a Customer ’s Profile, we assume that the Agent is working to help that Customer. When the Agent navigates away from the Profile, then we assume that the Agent is no longer working to help that Customer. Thus, when an Agent is viewing a Customer’s Profile, we track this time as time an Agent is working on a Customer. This is the time that we use to calculate handle times.

For Work Sessions reporting, Handle Time is calculated when an Agent is viewing a Customer's Profile once the Agent is assigned or has joined the Contact session. For outbound Contacts, Agents can be assigned manually, or are automatically assigned once they send the first message. If an Agent views the Customer's Profile before joining, that Handle Time is tracked for Conversation Handle Time, but will not appear in the Work Sessions reports.

Note

We only track this time for Conversations that are in the Open or Waiting state.

Using this definition of work, we can:

  • Calculate handle time in an omnichannel world
  • Compare handle times across Channels
  • Account for Agents working on concurrent Customers without needing an additional Avg. Concurrency metric
  • Track a second by second view of Agent activity which results in a more accurate handle time

Conversation Handle Time is defined at a high level in the Data Dictionary.

Examples

You may be interested in even more detail on how time is tracked, for those situations where Agents’ workflows are more complex. Below are a few scenarios that might occur, and how time is tracked in each. Keep in mind the limitations mentioned above if you are looking at Conversation-level or Work Session-level reports.

  • Viewing other pages in Gladly. Agent views a Customer Profile on Gladly, then navigates to their Inbox or a Search page. The time before the Agent navigates away from the Profile is tracked as Handle Time for that Customer.
  • Viewing other tools. Agent views a Customer Profile on Gladly, then opens a different program to pull up information for that Customer. They have not closed their Gladly tab or navigated to a different page in Gladly, and they have not been marked Away. This time is tracked as Handle Time for that Customer.
  • Viewing a new tab. Agent views a Customer Profile on Gladly, then opens a new tab in their browser. They have not closed their Gladly tab or navigated to a different page in Gladly, and they have not been marked Away. This time is tracked as Handle Time for that Customer.
  • Multiple tabs with different Customers in Gladly. Agent views Customer Profile A on Gladly in one tab, then opens a new tab with Customer Profile B on Gladly. The time after the Agent opens Profile B is tracked as Handle Time for Customer B.
Note
We do not recommend that Agents use multiple tabs of Gladly. If an Agent has multiple tabs of Gladly open at one time, and moves quickly between them, this may cause inconsistent time tracking.
  • Multitasking on a phone call. Agent is on a phone call with Customer A while viewing their Customer Profile on Gladly, then they navigate in Gladly to the Profile for Customer B while they are still on the phone. The time that the Agent is viewing Customer A’s Profile is tracked as Handle Time for Customer A, and the time the Agent is viewing Customer B’s Profile is tracked as Handle Time for Customer B.
  • Going idle to Away. Agent views a Customer Profile on Gladly, then walks away from their computer. They have not closed their Gladly tab or navigated to a different page in Gladly, and they have not marked themselves Away. After a period of inactivity (configured by an Administrator), the Agent is marked Away. The time before the Agent is marked Away is tracked as Handle Time for that Customer.
  • Going idle to Logged Out. Agent views a Customer Profile on Gladly, then walks away from their computer. They have not closed their Gladly tab or navigated to a different page in Gladly, and they have not marked themselves Away. After a period of inactivity (configured by an Administrator), the Agent is marked Away. Then, after a further period of inactivity, the Agent is logged out. The time before the Agent is marked Away is tracked as Handle Time for that Customer.
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